Amitié

chris marker photograph aka sandor krasna

Sandor Krasna, Flikr
Amitié | Friendship with the animal kingdom, arguably the source, along with music, of emotional connection in all of Chris Marker’s creations.

loving domesticated and non domesticated animals, loving music – sources of the emotional connection in Chris Marker’s creations, bypassing the intellectual activity of resolving word and image, working on the subliminal level so that your mind is opened but also your heart — only realized later why do you feel the way you do after watching a marker film? this may be a clue, an essai… at the emotional power, very unsung, in his films and shown here too in his photography… with great friendship comes the possibility of great loss.. we felt that… we sure did…

Peter Blum Presents Chris Marker ‘Koreans’

Chris Marker Koreans at Peter Blum Gallery

PETER BLUM GALLERY
Blumarts Inc. 20 West 57th Street | www.peterblumgallery.com | New York, NY 10019
art@peterblumgallery.com | Tel 212 244 6055

For Immediate Release:

Chris Marker : Koreans

September 4 — October 18, 2014

Peter Blum is pleased to announce the exhibition Chris Marker: Koreans, which opens on September 4th at 20 West 57th Street, New York.

Chris Marker was one of the last journalists who had the unique opportunity to travel and explore North Korea freely in 1957. The result of these travels was a group of 51 photographs entitled Koreans. This series reflects an uncensored record of daily life in North Korea four years after the end of the devastating war and shortly before the border was closed off.

The essay herewith attached was written by Marker in 2009 conveying his thoughts and observations of this trip to North Korea.

Peter Blum Gallery Koreans Chris Marker

Chris Marker (1921-2012) is one of the most influential and important filmmakers to emerge in the post-war era. Marker appeared on the Paris cultural landscape as a writer and editor and also became identified for his uniquely expressive non-fiction films. Marker garnered international recognition in 1962 with the science-fiction short film La Jetée. In the seventies, Marker created documentaries both on the history of the left (Le Fond de l’air est rouge, 1977) and travel and memory (Sans Soleil, 1982). Marker also produced acclaimed media installations including Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men, shown at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 2005 and presented by Peter Blum at Art Basel Unlimited in 2006, and Silent Movie, 1995. Selected solo exhibitions include: the Whitechapel Gallery, London (retrospective); MIT List Visual Arts Center and Carpenter Visual Arts Center, Cambridge (retrospective); The Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (retrospective); Atelier Hermès, Seoul; Les Rencontres d’Arles de la Photographie, Arles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; MoMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; The Jeu de Paume, Paris; The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin; and Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona.

For additional information and photographic material please contact David Blum or Andrea Serbonich at art@peterblumgallery.com.

Chris Marker @ Peter Blum Gallery NYC, Koreans

In 1957, I had the opportunity to join a group of French journalists “invited” to visit North Korea. I would only realize later what a unique opportunity that was. The four years following the war (a conflict soberly described by General Bradley as the “wrong war, in the wrong place, at the wrong time, and with the wrong enemy”) had been dedicated mostly to rebuilding a bomb-stricken country, and the formidable propaganda machine that would soon be identified with the sheer mention of North Korea wasn’t yet running at full throttle. We were subjected to a sizable dose of propaganda, but between two obligatory sessions of Socialist kowtowing, our hosts allowed us an amount of free walking unequalled since. Many years later, I could contemplate on television the predicament of a Belgian delegation whose members supplicated their guide to see, at least once, a marketplace -and after having visited the museum in honor of comrade Kim Jong-il, the library with the complete works of comrade Kim Jong-il, the factory that followed the directives of comrade Kim Jong-il, they were finally taken to an empty space outside the city, where a marketplace would be established according to the plans of comrade Kim Jong-il. Watching the image of hopelessness on the faces of the poor wretches made me appreciate even more the liberty I had enjoyed to hang around Pyongyang with my camera and to look everywhere, including marketplaces. Amusingly, the result of those strolls was equally rejected on both sides of the 38th parallel. To the North, a book which never mentioned once the name of Kim Il-sung simply didn’t exist. To the South, the raw fact that it had been allowed to be done in North Korea made it a tool of communist propaganda. That’s how, I was told, it was exhibited in Seoul’s counter-revolutionary museum, and its author introduced as a “Marxist dog”. I didn’t mind. Since Snoopy, the word “dog” has ceased to be an insult in my cats-ruled world. Then Time froze on that country whose culture had fascinated me, as well as the mesmerizing beauty of its women, while the megalomaniac leadership of both Kims had proven a disaster. Many examples of that freeze would appear in the news, the most recent so incredible that it escaped many commentators. When the DPRK (that’s its official name) launched the famous rocket that worried the whole world, the KOREAN NEWS agency published the following communiqué : “The Secretariat of the C.C., the Communist Party of the Soviet Union fully supports the steadfast stand of the Workers’ Party of Korea led by General Secretary Kim Jong Il”. Yes, you read correctly : “Soviet Union”. In 2009. Perhaps nobody ever dared to update comrade Kim Jong-il.
Chris Marker, 2009

Wall, Peter Blum Gallery, New York, Chris Marker Koreans

Installation Views Courtesy of Peter Blum Gallery, New York
Works Courtesy of the Chris Marker Estate and Peter Blum Gallery, New York

BAM Presents Chris Marker Retrospective

Chris Marker at Brooklyn Academy of Music

Sorry for the late notice. I have been staring at my to do list with this extraordinary retrospective at the Brooklyn Academy of Music with glazed eyes, hesitating. Hesitate and you’re lost. I was lost. But kudos to those who found their way to BAM for these essential Chris Marker films. Hopefully this note in a bottle will reach land in time for a few to catch the remaining screenings. The last time I was at BAM it was for Terry Riley. What a fantastic memory. Time to make some new ones. Enjoy!

Part of BAMcinématek

A sui generis cinema poet who virtually invented the essay film, French multimedia artist Chris Marker used highly personal collages of moving images, photography, and text to explore weighty themes of time, memory, and political upheaval with a playful wit and a remarkably agile mind. Marxism, time travel, and cartoon cats all co-exist in Marker’s dazzlingly imaginative alternate realities.

This comprehensive retrospective features the North American theatrical premiere of Marker’s 1997 film Level Five, newly restored and playing for one week only.www.bam.org/film/2014/chris-marker

Screenings

  • Prime Time + Sixth Side of the Pentagon + Embassy, Tues. Aug. 26, 2014
  • Bestiary + Les hommes de la baleine + Three Cheers for the Whale, Wed. Aug. 27, 2014
  • The Koumiko Mystery + Matta, Wed., Aug. 27, 2014
  • If I Had 4 Dromedaires + Remembrance of Things to Come, Thu. Aug. 28, 2014

Past Events

  • Level Five
  • Far From Vietnam
  • Le Joli Mai
  • A Letter from Siberia + Sunday in Peking
  • The Battle of the Ten Million
  • 2084 + Be Seeing You + Class of Stuggle
  • La Jetée + Statues Also Die
  • Sans Soleil
  • The Last Bolshevik
  • A Grin Without a Cat
  • Description of a Stuggle + A Valparaíso
  • One Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich + The Train Rolls On

About BAM

BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) is a multi-arts center located in Brooklyn, New York. For more than 150 years, BAM has been the home for adventurous artists, audiences, and ideas—engaging both global and local communities. With world-renowned programming in theater, dance, music, opera, film, and much more, BAM showcases the work of emerging artists and innovative modern masters.www.bam.org/about

Level Five

Level Five

Marker’s shock-to-the-senses mind-melter concerns a woman (Belkhodja) haunted by the loss of her lover while working on programming a video game about World War II’s Battle of Okinawa. Melding retro-futuristic sci-fi imagery, references to American film noir, and reflections on traumas in Japanese history into a visually and philosophically provocative puzzle, Level Five is a hallucinatory visual essay on memory, tragedy, and early digital culture. Courtesy of Icarus Films.

 

Far From Vietnam

Far From Vietnam
Directed by Jean-Luc Godard, Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais | 1967

Marker was the driving force behind this blistering statement of opposition to America’s invasion of Vietnam. Six of Europe’s leading filmmakers mixed found footage, interviews, agitprop, and fictional tableaux (by Godard and Resnais) in this film The New York Times said “could be both the most eloquent and rankling protest film ever made.”

Harun Farocki 1944-2014

Harun Farocki

Harun Farocki was born in 1944 in German-annexed Czechoslovakia. From 1966 to 1968 he attended the Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin (DFFB). In addition to teaching posts in Berlin, Düsseldorf, Hamburg, Manila, Munich and Stuttgart, he has been a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

Farocki has made close to 90 films, including three feature films, essay films and documentaries. He has worked in collaboration with other filmmakers as a scriptwriter, actor and producer. In 1976 he staged Heiner Müller’s plays The Battle and Tractor together with Hanns Zischler in Basel, Switzerland.

Since 1966 he has written for numerous publications, and from 1974 to 1984 he was editor and author of the magazine Filmkritik (München). His work has shown in many national and international exhibitions and installations in galleries and museums.

Thanks to Dirk K., who sent the following news and citation. I will have so much more to say, when it is time… Dirk writes:

Harun Farocki died yesterday.

He certainly understood a thing or two about Marker, the modus operandi of Sans Soleil, and its effects:

SANS SOLEIL … has an extraordinary text — a text that emanates from a lifetime’s preoccupation with cinema, as you just sketched it. This text can also be reproduced without the film, by which I do not at all imply that the images in the film are somehow worthless. Rather, the text has had such a strong effect that in some places nobody paid much attention to the images. To give a small example: there is a scene in SANS SOLEIL where the camera accompanies two people visiting a grave. It rushes ahead of them and waits for them at the graveside, just like a television crew would do it, if it had the time and a chance to stage things. Why does the camera rush ahead? — this sort of question has not generated any critical energy. I probably write, or rather: occupy myself with writing, in order to determine the difference between film and text. I want to make films that are not that far removed from texts, and that are nonetheless very distinct.

Harun Farocki: Working on the Sightlines, ed. Thomas Elsaesser. Feb 2014, 180

OK, me again. Here are some preliminary reflections from Germany, France and the US.

Obits & Appreciations

Zum Tode Harun Farockis: Einzelkämpfer gegen die Macht der Bilder
spiegel.de

Harun Farocki, Celebrated Filmmaker, Dead at 70
news.artnet.com

Harun Farocki n’expérimentera plus
next.liberation.fr

Harun Farocki: Der ungeschminkte Blick auf die Realität
zeit.de

Der Filmemacher Harun Farocki ist gestorben
welt.de

Regisseur Harun Farocki tot
spex.de

Watch Harun Farocki Explain His Final Solo Show
news.artnet.com

Further Reading

I will be posting further articles on Farocki as they appear to my Google + page. I will also brush up a dusty article I wrote on Images of the World and the Inscription of War, potentially Farocki’s most prominent essay film.

If you have not read Farocki’s printed essays, a good manual to have is his (regrettably out of print to my knowledge) book Nachdruck/Imprint Texte/Writings, ed. Susanne Gaensheimer, Nicolaus Schafhausen, trans. Laurent Faasch-Ibrahim, assistant ed. Volker Pantenburg, New York: Lukas & Sternberg, 2001. Most recently, Farocki published Harun Farocki: Diagrams: Images from Ten Films, along with Thomas Elsaesser and Maren Grimm, with Benedikt Reichenbach as editor. He is also co-author with Paul Virilio of the hyper-contemporary Serious Games: War-Media-Art, like Nachdruck/Imprint bi-lingual in English and German.

Soda Pictures Releases 3 DVD Chris Marker Collection in English

Chris Marker Collection, a 3 DVD set of Chris Marker films published to coincide with the Whitechapel exhibition currently running in London, is out! The 3 DVD collection of Chris Marker films was published June 2, 2014 by SODA Film+Art and is now available for purchase. It’s a thrilling addition to Marker’s English-language releases. Without further ado, here are the overall details on the release. We’ll ad some additional images down the road.

Chris Marker Collection DVD set

Contents

BLU-RAY

  • Sunday in Peking (Dimanche á Pékin, 1956, 22 min)
  • Letter From Siberia (Lettre de Sibérie, 1958, 62 min)

DVD 1

  • Sunday in Peking (Dimanche á Pékin, 1956, 22 min)
  • Letter From Siberia (Lettre de Sibérie, 1958, 62 min)
  • Description of a Struggle (Description d’un combat, 1960, 60 min)

DVD 2

  • The Sixth Side of the Pentagon (La Sixiéme face du Pentagone, 1968, 27 min)
  • The Embassy (L’Ambassade, 1973, 20 min)
  • Theory of Sets (Théorie des ensembles, 1991, 11 min)
  • Three Video Haikus (Trois Vidéo Haikus, 1994, 3 min)
  • Blue Helmet (Casque blue, 1996, 26 min)
  • E-CLIP-SE (1999, 8 min)
  • The Case of the Grinning Cat (Chats perchés, 2004, 59 min)

Blu-Ray tech info: Aspect ratio: 4:3 | Running time: 80 mins. approx. | Audio LPCM 2.0 Stereo
Language English/French with English subtitles S| Region B | Colour | 1080p | 24fps

DVD Tech info: Aspect ratio: 4:3 | DVD 1 Running time: 134 mins. approx. | DVD2 Running time: 154 mins. approx. | PAL
Language English/French with English subtitles | Audio Dolby Digital 2.0 Sterio | Region 2 | 1080p | 24fps

Chris Marker Collection - interior

Passion for Words, Madness for Images

This collection of Chris Marker films consists of three works that pre-date La Jetée, the featurette that firmly planted his name as a filmmaker, as well as a series of seven shorter films that span each decade of his career thereafter. These remarkable curios reveal much about him, his ideas and his visuality, as well as his take on the modern world from an artistic point-of-view – from China, Siberia and Israel in the 1950s to the Pentagon, art collectives, cheshire cats, haikus and early new media.

Released in conjunction with a major exhibition at Whitechapel Gallery, London, and with a new piece by writer and curator Chris Darke (Rediscovering Chris Marker), alongside a seminal early piece by Roger Tailleur (Markeriana: A Scarcely Critical Description of the Work of Chris Marker).

Chris Marker Collection DVD 1 - Pentagon

About Soda Film + Art

Soda Film + Art (SoFA) is an international agency that focuses on visual artists working in feature filmmaking. It operates at the nexus of film and art, and acts as a centralised bureau for development, production, sales, distribution and exhibition support. SoFA also has a collectable DVD label, with bespoke packaging that is unique to each title and artist vision, but together forms a cohesive library – and ultimately an overview of what’s happening in art + film today.www.sodafilmart.com

Purchase: sodapictures.squarespace.com

Rediscovering Chris Marker

By 2002, it was evidently no longer enough to describe Marker simply as a ‘filmmaker’; cinema was merely one of the forms into which this prolific artist had channelled his protean creativity. When Marker died in July 2012, aged 91, he left behind an utterly singular body of work. From his first appearance in print as an author in 1946 to his final film, a 60-second ‘trailer’ for the 2012 Vienna film festival, his oeuvre spanned over 65 years and was remarkable in its scope. He designed and edited books, published journalism and essays, as well as a novel and short stories. As a visual artist, he was an accomplished photographer, cartoonist, and multimedia practitioner. But he remains best remembered as a filmmaker, with more than forty-five titles to his name and over thirty more as a commentary-writer or editor.
Chris Darke, "Rediscovering Chris Marker", Chris Marker Collection booklet, 5

Rare Chris Marker Post-War Memory Published

music memoryI just published a text sent by Chris Darke, who has seen to its translation and encouraged its publication here, for which I am profoundly grateful. The text is one Marker wrote at the request of Jean-Jacques Birgé, answering the question Images gravitate around music. Which has marked you the most? You can find the text as An Image Just Appeared by Chris Marker.

The text shows the remarkable blend of keen memory, eye for emblematic images, and historical consciousness that we find inscribed in many of Marker’s films and installations (Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men comes to mind, for one). Once again, as in Sans Soleil, the wounds of history meet the compassionate gaze of memory. En plus, the text reminds us of Marker’s deep attachment to music – in this case, jazz. It is an attachment that works subliminally in many of his films to deepen the emotional reach of the projection and audition for the spectator. It’s what made Chat écoutant la musique possible: another treasure of memory and music.

In prefacing his remarks, Marker hints at how large ‘memory’ can become – stretching space and time like an expanding universe, an impossible architecture – within a single lifetime.

The image below is of one of the ships that Marker references in this memory text.

Exodus